Courses

The Department of History offers a wide variety of classes in a broad array of regions and time periods. For a complete listing of all the courses the Department offers, see the Online Catalogue.

Below is an unofficial list of courses taught in the History Department in Fall 2017. It is strictly for the use of expanded course descriptions. For the complete official course offerings, both graduate and undergraduate, please consult the UIC SCHEDULE OF CLASSES

UIC History Course Descriptions Fall 2017

HIST 100 - Western Civilization to 1648
MWF 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM
Abbott, J

A broad historical survey of human events prior to the modern era, History 100 stresses the diversity and interaction of peoples and cultures in the making of Western Civilization. As we work our way across the lands of Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean world and northern Europe, we devote particular attention to the evolving relations between government and religion, and the conflicting claims of reason and faith, in our story. In charting this journey, lectures and our class textbook will provide the overall storyline and context. But the heart of this course lies in our critical engagement with the documentary record left by the historical actors themselves – Greek, Roman, Christian, Islamic and medieval among them – as they commented upon and interceded in their times. 

Course Information: 3 hours.  Past, and World Cultures course. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture.


HIST 101 - Western Civilization Since 1648
MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Sack, J

Introduction to the development of Western civilization in the early modern and modern world.The course will cover, amongst other topics, the Enlightenment, the rise of capitalism, the French and Industrial revolutions,, Communism, World Wars I and II, and the Hitler  phenomena. 

The  Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Past course, and World Cultures course.


HIST 101 Western Civilization Since 1648
MWF 12-12:50pm
N Jordan

Introduction to the development of Western civilization in the early modern and modern world. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Past course, and World Cultures course.


HIST 103 Early America: From Colonization to Civil War and Reconstruction
MWF 11-11:50am

Covers political, cultural, and social developments during the Colonial and early American period. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Past course, and US Society course.


HIST 104 Modern America: From Industrialization to Globalization
MWF 10-10:50am
K Schultz

This course is the broad survey of American history from the era shortly after the Civil War (1861-1865) to the present day.  By listening to music, watching videos, reading novels, and examining political cartoons, this class will take you through the major events of the past 150 years that have shaped our country. 


HIST 105 - Global Transformations and the Rise of the West Since 1000
MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Daly, J

The West's history is one of extraordinary success; no other region, empire, culture, or civilization has left so powerful a mark upon the world. This course charts the West's achievements―representative government, the free enterprise system, modern science, and the rule of law―as well as its misdeeds―two frighteningly destructive World Wars, the Holocaust, imperialistic domination, and the Atlantic slave trade.
 
Adopting a global perspective, the course explores the contributions of other cultures and civilizations to the West's emergence. It also traces the rise of Western power through a series of revolutions, including social, political, technological, military, commercial, and industrial. 

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as INST 105. Past course. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion and one Lecture. Not online course.
 

HIST 106 The World Since 1400
MW 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM, 2LCC C001
K Hoppe

This course is about cross-cultural interactions, about the circulation and flow of people and commodities and ideas across oceans and between world regions – what world historians call “world-systems”.  This course is not a narrative history of nation-states, empires, or cultural core areas, but looks at big world-system shifts since 1400: the Islamic Indian Ocean world system, the Atlantic slave trade world system, nation-states, industrial capitalism, modern imperialism, and the Cold War. 


HIST 114 Topics in World History: How Film Helped Make Fascism
MWF 11-11:50pm
J Abbott
        

HIST 117 - Understanding the Holocaust
TR 09:30 AM - 10:45 AM, 2BH 209
Levy, R 

This course will attempt to place the Holocaust of European Jewry into historical perspective.  Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, films, and lectures, the student will confront a painful, emotionally--charged subject matter.  Our purpose is not, however, to whip up sympathy for the victims or to engage in commemorative activities.  Rather we shall do the best we can to come to a rational understanding of one of the hallmark events of the twentieth century.
The course is divided into three parts:  1) the origins and development of antisemitic ideology; 2) the history of German political institutions, 1848-1933; and the coming together of these two elements to produce, 3) the genocide of European Jews.  Students will write 3 4-page book reviews selected from a provided bibliography, the first two of which will be extensively critiqued and returned.  In addition there will be six short answer quizzes on class readings.

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as JST 117 and RELS 117. Individual and Society, and Past course.


HIST 137 - Russia in War and Revolution, 1904-1922
Online version
Daly, J 

There was no more world-changing event of the twentieth century than the Russian Revolution of 1917. It laid low the world's biggest empire and brought to power revolutionaries—the Bolsheviks—determined to transform their country and the world. Guided by the political philosophy of Karl Marx, the Bolshevik leaders nationalized all businesses, real estate, landed property, and financial assets. They repudiated traditional diplomacy and what they called "imperialist war." They worked to abolish the free market and money. They legalized abortion, simplified divorce, and appointed the world’s first female ambassador and cabinet minister. They also launched a crusade against world capitalism.

Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion. Online version.

Course Information: 3 hours. Individual and Society course, and Past course.


HIST 150 - Catholicism in U.S. History
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

The Catholic experience in the United States from its colonial origins to the present. US Society course.


HIST 170 The Ottoman Empire
TR 2-3:15pm

The Ottoman empire controlled most of the present Middle East, North Africa, and the Balkans for over 500 years. The history of these societies is, therefore, inextricably linked with the Ottoman past; and yet, the memory of this past is highly controversial today, shaping international relations and offering a platform for contending interpretations in soap operas and other popular venues. But who really were the Ottomans? And what did they achieve?

In this introductory course, we will focus on the social, cultural, and political history of the Ottoman empire from its beginnings in circa 1300 to its fall in 1922. We will not only reflect on how the Ottomans ruled the conquered territories, but also how the subjects of the Ottoman sultans—men and women; elites, commoners, and slaves; Muslims, Christians, and Jews—experienced everyday life.
Past, and World Cultures course.


HIST 199 - Chicago and the World
MWF 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

Introduction to American history, key institutions, culture, and society through the lens of Chicago as a global city. Introduction to the college experience and development of key academic skills.


HIST 202 - The Ancient World: Greece
TR 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM
Z Papakonstantinou

This course offers a survey of the main political, social and cultural developments in ancient Greece from the Neolithic period (7th millennium BC) until the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). Lectures will be delivered in chronological sequence, with particular emphasis on politics, society, warfare, religion and everyday life. The course will also provide an introduction to the major literary and archaeological evidence for the history of Greece in antiquity. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Greek history.  Past, and World Cultures course.


HIST 204 - Greek Art and Archaeology
MWF 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM
K Ros


HIST 213 - Europe in the Age of Capitalism and Imperialism, 1815 - 1914
MWF 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM, 2BH 208
Abbott, J 

From the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I, nineteenth-century Europe was crucible and testing-ground for wide-ranging innovation and sweeping transformation. Course readings and discussion will draw heavily upon contemporary documents and texts, as we examine the contending ideologies and social movements, as well as the cultural departures and political challenges, of these years.

Course Information: 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and Past course.


HIST 217 - Introduction to United States Military History
W 06:00 PM - 09:00 PM
Klatt, B; Stack, L; Rosebrock, C; Dunn, B

Analytical study of American military history, doctrine, strategy, and tactics from their origin through the present. Emphasis on leadership, strategy, the principles of war, and growth of the military in the US. Past course.

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as MILS 217. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ENGL 161. Past course.


HIST 221 - The Atlantic Slave Trade
MW 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
K Hoppe

The Atlantic slave trade and plantation economy – extending over almost 400 years – were central to the rise of industrial capitalism and to the rise of the modern ideology of racism.  The slave trade and plantation economy transformed the histories of parts of Africa, the Caribbean, North, South and Central America, and of Europe.  We will follow the trade from the production of slaves in Africa, “seasoning” (breaking captives into the slave system) on both sides of the Atlantic, the middle passage, and slave labor, cultures and resistance in the Americas. 

Course Information: Same as AAST 221. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.


HIST 244- France 1500-1715
TR 03:30 PM-04:45 PM
McClure, Ellen

In this class, we’ll explore this formative and transitional period in French history. From the savagery of the religious wars that almost tore apart the country to the magnificence and ceremonial of Versailles, we’ll consider questions, more relevant than ever today, of legitimacy, authority, and identity. Readings include excerpts from Calvin, Descartes, and Pascal, plays by Molière, and original (translated) historical documents. 

3 hours. Prerequisite: English 161. Individual and Society, and Past course.


HIST 229 - Topics in African Diaspora Studies
MWF 05:00 PM - 06:15 PM
L Jackson

Interdisciplinary, in-depth study of the making of the African Diaspora-- the forced and voluntary movement of African peoples around the globe. Topics may include Africans in Latin America, The Black Atlantic, Colonialism and Resistance. Past, and World Cultures course.


HIST 234 History of Poland
TR 12:30-1:45pm
M Wilczewski

Over the past 25 years, the Poles have transformed their country from a communist regime controlled by the Soviet Union to a democratic society based on a free market economy. This class explores the antecedents of contemporary problems in Poland. It examines the social, political, and cultural history of the Polish lands from the earliest written record in the 10th century to the present day. The course considers the consolidation and expansion of the Polish state in the medieval and early modern periods, the evolution (and decline) of “noble democracy,” repeated foreign incursions and Poland’s changing place in the world. Emphasizing the changing meanings of Polishness over time, we look at the fluctuating boundaries of Polish territory, the shifting membership in the Polish national community, and the diverse population that comprised this heterogeneous state. Topics include the Golden Age of Polish culture, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Poland, constitutionalism and the 18th century partitions, the rise of modern nationalism, the construction of democracy during the interwar Second Republic, the impact of the dual Nazi and Soviet occupations, the Nazi Holocaust; Communism and political dissidence, Solidarity and the collapse of the communist system, and the transition to liberal democracy.


HIST 255 - History of Chicago
MWF 01:00 PM - 01:50 PM

The development of Chicago from frontier outpost to post-industrial metropolis; economic, social, political, and cultural changes and institutions; suburbanization and deindustrialization. Past, and US Society course.


HIST 261 - Latin America to 1850
TR 09:30 AM - 10:45 AM, 2BH 208
Villa-Flores, J 

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Spanish and Portuguese America from the late pre-Contact era throughout the Wars of Independence, the formation of post-colonial states and the rise of caudillismo (circa 1450-1850). It offers a broad overview of Latin America during the colonial era, concentrating on the cultural, political, social, and economic interactions between Europeans, Amerindians, Africans, and peoples of mixed-race descent. Among the themes to be discussed are: cultural contact and conflict, social organization and stratification, religion and spirituality, gender relations, patterns of resistance, incipient nationalism, and the difficult construction of the new nation states.

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as LALS 261. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Past, and World Cultures course. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion.


HIST 262 - Latin America Since 1850
TR 11:00-12:15pm
J Chavez

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as LALS 262. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Past, and World Cultures course. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion.

This class examines the social and political history of modern Latin America. It is organized topically. We will read landmark texts as well as recent publications on a range of themes, including: anti-colonial mobilizations and slave emancipation in Haiti (Saint Domingue); indigenous rebellions in the central Andean region; independence of Spanish America; empire, slavery, and liberalism in Brazil; independence and slave emancipation in Cuba; the rise of the U.S. Empire in the Caribbean basin; discourses on race and nation in Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico; and twenty century revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. Students enrolled in this class will learn about the evolution of this field of historical research and enhance their research, writing, and analytical skills through a variety of activities and assignments.


HIST 267 - American Intellectual History to 1865
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
J Sklansky

This course explores a series of major themes in the history of American social thought from the beginning of English colonization to the Civil War. Five broad units examine the religious and scientific revolutions of the colonial era, the related discourses of political economy and domestic economy in the revolutionary era and the new nation, spiritual and psychological dimensions of social reform in the early nineteenth century, literary and philosophical responses to the “market revolution,” and the rise of antislavery, proslavery, and humanitarian thought in the antebellum era.

Course information: 3 hours. Same as POLS 267. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion.


HIST/GLAS 271 - China, 1500-1911
MWF 10:00 - 10:50 (with Friday sections at 10:00 and 11:00)
L Hostetler

History/GLAS 272 looks at the cultural, social, intellectual, and political history of late imperial China, which encompassed the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1636-1911) dynasties.  During this period the population of imperial China tripled, and the territory it controlled doubled through a multi-faceted process of imperial expansion and consolidation. These events created an important legacy for the People’s Republic of China today. We will also consider how the Ming and the Qing dynasties interacted with other parts of the world at various times, how these interactions affected the course of China’s history, and how the history of this period contributed to shaping modern China.
 
This course also focuses on skill building including: analytical reading, oral communication, and writing--including the development of a thesis, use of evidence in supporting a scholarly argument, and proper documentation.


HIST 275/GLAS 276 - History of South Asia to 1857
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
R Mantena

This course is an introduction to the history of the diverse civilizations, religious traditions and cultures of South Asia through lecture, class discussion, and film. We will explore the cultural, social, and political developments in the region from the Indus Valley period to the rise of the British Empire. Some of the topics and themes covered in this course are: the rise of the Indo-Aryans, the beginnings of Empire in South Asia, the birth of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism, Classical Culture, devotional Hinduism, the founding of the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughal Empire, and finally the coming of the Europeans to the subcontinent.

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as GLAS 275. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. Past, and World Cultures course. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion.


HIST 290 - Mexican-American History
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
A Goodman

Today, some 35 million people of Mexican origin live in the United States, including more than 11 million immigrants. Mexicans represent the largest immigrant group in the country and make up 11% of the total population. This course explores Mexican American history since the colonial era, with a focus on the post-1848 period. Students will learn about the diverse experiences of ethnic Mexicans through a close examination of primary sources, secondary texts, fiction, and film. We will cover, among other topics, the creation of the US-Mexico border; Mexican American identity and community formation; the history of Mexican Chicago; intra-ethnic relations; gender and labor organizing; the Bracero Program and undocumented migration; return migration, repatriation, and deportation; Cesar Chavez and the farm worker movement; the Chicana/o Movement; NAFTA and the militarization of the border; and contemporary migration and transnational immigrant activism. 

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as LALS 290.


HIST 292 - History and Theories of Feminism
MW 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM
Brier, J

This class is designed to introduce you to the evolution of feminist thought since the eighteenth century. We will spend the semester analyzing historical and contemporary examples written by theorists and activists responding to the "woman question," women’s rights and gender justice in a variety of geographic contexts. We will also engage with questions of power and difference within these categories, paying special attention to how the intersections of race, class and sexuality have animated feminist thought. While the texts we will read share a commitment to interrogating these questions, they differ in terms of how to define the problem as well as the solutions. Our job in this class is not to agree or disagree with any one position, but rather to assess, critically, how feminism, as a political ideology, has emerged and what the consequences of that emergence have been. 

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as GWS 292. Recommended background: GWS 101 or GWS 102.


HIST 300 -  History Methods Colloquium (required for majors): Revolutions in Latin American History
TR 2-3:15pm
Chavez, J

Course Information: 3 hours. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): History major with 9 hours of history credit. Majors are encouraged to take this course as soon as they become eligible.

HIST 300 - History Methods Colloquium (required for majors): Nationalism and Individualism in Modern European History 
M 3-5:50pm
Jordan, N.

History 300 provides history majors a semester-length workshop in historical methods and writing. Our topical focus is the evolution of European church-state relations, considered in their cultural, social and political dimensions. We will examine the interplay between religious doctrine and political theory, the clash and convergence of confessional and national identities, and the shifting relations between citizens, states, and religious authority. In investigating these matters, we will draw upon a handful of books, articles and primary source materials. The heart of this course however lies in ways in which students hone their interpretive and expository skills through an intensive schedule of assigned writings, discussion, revision, and class presentation.

Course Information: 3 hours. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): History major with 9 hours of history credit. Majors are encouraged to take this course as soon as they become eligible.


HIST 398 - Honors Project
Student will complete an independent honors thesis project under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. 

Course Information: 3 hours. No more than 6 hours of credit allowed in combination of HIST 398 and 399. Prerequisite(s): History major with junior or senior standing; cumulative GPA of 3.00; major GPA of 3.75; and departmental approval. Instructor Approval Required. This course counts toward the limited number of independent study hours accepted toward the degree and the major.


HIST 408 - Athenian Democracy and Society in the Age of Aristophanes
TR 03:30 PM - 04:45PM
Papakonstantinou, Z

This course examines the politics, society, culture and literature of classical Athens (5th and 4th centuries BCE). Following a few introductory lectures that will set the stage and provide the necessary historical background, our emphasis will shift on major themes in the history and culture of Athens during the period in question: the Athenian empire and the war against Sparta, the emergence and development of the Athenian democracy, the economy, wealth and social status, art and architecture, gender and aspects of daily life (e.g. drinking parties, sport, magic). Some lectures will be complemented by readings of select primary sources in translation. No prior knowledge of ancient history or Greek literature is required.

Course Information: 3 OR 4 hours. Same as CL 408. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Recommended background: one of the following courses: HIST 202, CL 251, CL 252, CL 405 or HIST 405. G4 U3


HIST 410 - Topics in Modern European History: “Film in a Totalitarian Age: European Dictators and Directors, 1925-1951”
W 3-5pm
Abbott, J.

Europe’s “Age of Dictators” refers to those years, between World Wars I and II, when fascist, Bolshevik and authoritarian regimes towered over European affairs. These governments, along with their democratic counterparts in Britain and North America, led in forging the techniques and conventions we associate with modern propaganda, and cinema was central to this project. In examining this history, we will focus especially upon Nazi Germany and Stalin’s Soviet Union, looking at each country’s movie industry and the bid by leading artists – sometimes reluctantly, often enthusiastically – to carry out their state’s propagandistic agendas. Above all, we will examine the movies themselves, identifying and evaluating the techniques, imagery and scenarios by which film-makers sought to make Nazi, fascist or Bolshevik ideology consistent with the highest callings of patriotic duty and heroic action.  

 

HIST 418 - Topics in German History:  “The German Dictatorship” 
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Levy, R

A discussion/lecture course with extensive primary and secondary source readings, History 418 deals with the effects of in­dustrialization and the many faceted political and social crises it precipi­tated in the period 1890-1945.  The causes of the disintegration of the Bismarckian state in the First World War, that failure’s effect on the aborted democracy of the Weimar Republic, the historical roots of the Nazi “answer” to the Great Depression, and the murderous consequences of Nazism are the topics covered.  Performance on four short answer quizzes and the writing of three critical book reviews [4-6pp], chosen from a supplementary reading list, will determine the student’s final grade.

Course Information: Same as CEES 418. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of European history, or consent of the instructor.


HIST 420 - Teaching the Social Sciences
R 03:30 PM - 06:15 PM, 2LH 308
Peters, J 

Course Information: 3 OR 4 hours. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of credit in the social sciences and approval of the instructor. Departmental Approval Required G4 U3


HIST 437 - The Indian Ocean World: Contact, Commerce, Culture
TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Liechty, M

For most of human history the Indian Ocean has been the cross roads of cultural exchange and engine of commerce for the Afro-Eurasian world. This course explores the broad history of this “macro-region” from an oceanic point of view: that is, treating the ocean itself—its currents, winds, shorelines, diverse environments, distinct resources, and distances—as agent, shaping the nature of human interaction through time. From the south coast of China through Peninsular and Insular South East Asia, to the Indian subcontinent, the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula, to coastal East Africa and Madagascar, this course surveys the history of contact, commerce, and cultural exchange from the earliest times through the colonial era. Rather than focus on the great civilizations that arose on its shores, this course examines patterns of movement through the zone: of people, trade goods, technology, ideas, religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam), political systems, etc. In sum, the course considers the Indian Ocean World as a historical and cultural continuum.

Course Information: 3 hours. Same as ANTH 436 and GLAS 437.


HIST 440 - History Research Seminar: “US Social Movements”
TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Hudson, Lynn

Conceptualizing, researching, and writing an individual research project based on primary sources.

Course Information: 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): HIST 300. Recommended background: At least one 400-level history course.


HIST 440 - History Research Seminar: “Empires”
TR 02:00 PM - 03:15 PM
Mantena, R 

Hist 400 is devoted to conceptualizing, researching, and writing an individual research project based on primary sources. With this in mind, this seminar will give students the opportunity to explore the theme of “Empires” from ancient to modern histories of imperial expansion. Students will learn about the similarities and differences between the Roman, Ottoman, Spanish, Russian and the British Empire. What kind of political and cultural projects did empires take up? What were their successes and their failures? While the class is focussed on the theme of “Empires,” we will spend much of the time learning about the process of historical research, how to evaluate primary and secondary sources and how to formulate an argument from the evidence/sources gathered. The main goal of the class will be to produce a research paper at the end of term that will be closely evaluated in class workshops several times giving each student the opportunity to develop their writing and research skills. 

Course Information: 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): HIST 300. Recommended background: At least one 400-level history course.


HIST 454 - Topics in Twentieth-Century United States History: “US Immigration History and Policy”
T 03:30 PM - 06:15 PM
A Goodman

The United States is “a nation of immigrants,” or so the saying goes. But it is also “a nation by design” that has excluded and deported tens of millions of people throughout its history. Who has been allowed to enter the country and who has been allowed to stay? What role have race, economic concerns, politics, public health, religion, sexuality, and national origin played in determining who belongs? How has immigration shaped the United States and what it means to be American? This course will explore these questions, and others, through an examination of US immigration history and policy from the founding of the country to the present.


HIST 461 - Topics in Latin American History:  “Do the Winners Always Write History? Memory, History, and Power in Latin America”
TR 2-3:15 PM
J. Villa-Flores

Course Information: 3 OR 4 hours. Same as LALS 461. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of history, Latin American and Latino studies, or consent of the instructor. G4 U3


HIST 473 - Topics in East Asian History: “Dissent in China from the Earliest Times to the Present ”
T 03:00 PM - 05:50 PM
L Hostetler

This class provides students an opportunity to study dissent in China from a historical perspective. Together the class will read about and discuss famous historical figures and incidents from as early at the fourth century BCE up to the present. A series of short response papers will be required, and at least one presentation, but no major research paper.  

Course Information: 3 OR 4 hours. Same as GLAS 473. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of East Asian history or consent of the instructor. G4 U3


HIST 475 - Educational Practice with Seminar I
W 04:00 PM - 05:50 PM
Peters, J

Course Information: 6 hours. Graduate credit only with approval of the department. Prerequisite(s): Good academic standing in a teacher education program, completion of 100 clock hours of pre-student-teaching field experiences, and approval of the department. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.


HIST 476 - Educational Practice with Seminar II
Peters, J

Course Information: 6 hours. Graduate credit only with approval of the department. Prerequisite(s): Good academic standing in a teacher education program, completion of 100 clock hours of pre-student-teaching field experiences, credit or concurrent registration in HIST 475, and approval of the department. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Conference and one Practice.


GRADUATE COURSES

HISTORY 594 – ENCOUNTERS SEMINAR
Expulsion, Exile, and the Birth of the Modern Refugee: Forced Migration in Historical Context
Thursday, 5-8 pm
Keely Stauter-Halsted

People have long left home for political reasons, placing themselves in exile from the countries of their birth. But the legal category of refugee or asylum seeker grew out of a particular convergence of war, revolution, and genocide in the early twentieth century, culminating in new understandings of international law and new ways of treating vulnerable populations. This course examines the roots of the modern concept of statelessness, considering the history of forced evacuation, deportation, and genocidal campaigns as constitutive of a new set of legal statuses. Situated in the decline of empire and the rise of nation-states across Europe, Eurasia, and Southeast Asia, the course traces the ways notions of political homelessness have evolved in the modern period, assessing changes in how we view state, society, and the borders of belonging. It looks at the evolution of discourse and policy surrounding forced migration. Who counts as a political refugee and who is an “ordinary” economic or labor migrant? How are the criteria for citizenship determined and how have these definitions shifted over the past century? What concepts and institutional entities arose to address the problems associated with the resettlement of stateless or expelled people? And, most importantly, how have individuals, families, and whole communities reshaped themselves in response to moving borders and disappearing homelands?

Beginning with the late eighteenth-century invention of the concept of “human rights,” the course traces the waves of refugees created by nineteenth-century wars, pogroms, and exclusionary policies. It examines the reconstruction of Europe following World War I, the exodus from the Soviet Union after the Bolshevik Revolution, the flow of Jewish refugees from the former Pale of Settlement, and the process of repatriating thousands of nationals who found themselves on opposite sides of new international frontiers after the Versailles Peace Settlement. We trace the waves of exiles created during World War II and the population transfers brought about in the aftermath of decolonization in India and elsewhere. We look at the birth of new aid agencies and the professionalization of humanitarian assistance, Finally, the course evaluates the growing categories of exclusion at the border, including sexual, racial, religious and economic, and assesses the importance of memory and commemoration in constructing refugee images of home.  

Possible readings will include: Lynn Hunt, Inventing Human Rights; Michael Marrus, The Unwanted; Nick Baron and Peter Gatrell, Homelands: War, Population and Statehood in Eastern Europe and Russia; Ronald Suny, “They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else”: A History of the Armenian Genocide; Bruno Cabanes’ The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism; Rebecca Manley, To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War; Gregor Thum, Uprooted: How Breslau Became Wrocław During the Century of Expulsions; Tara Zahra, Reconstructing Europe’s Families after World War II; Eithne Luibheid, Entry Denied: Controlling Sexuality at the Border; and selections from Richard Bessel and Claudia B. Haake, Removing Peoples: Forced Removal in the Modern World.