Photo of Beaudreau, Kimberly

Kimberly Beaudreau

Graduate Student

Contact

Building & Room:

UH 1004

Address:

601 S Morgan St.

CV Download:

CV_kbeaudreau

Office Hours - Fall Semester
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday 02:00pm – 03:00pm
Wednesday 12:00pm – 01:00pm
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

About

Kimberly’s interest in history stemmed from her undergraduate honors thesis, “Mexico’s Programa Frontera Sur: Border Externalization and Decentralizing as Deterrence Along the Mexico-Guatemala Border”. Exploring how border externalization transformed policy creation and immigration enforcement within Mexico, as well as international relations between Mexico, United States, and Central America and the experience of Central American migrants piqued Kimberly’s interest in the larger historical experience of migrants and the trajectory of U.S. immigration policy over time.

 

Outside of UIC, Kimberly is a research assistant on a Global Study on the Domestic Impact of UN Human Rights Treaties in conjunction with the Human Rights Center at the University of Dayton. She also volunteers with the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights as a voter registration volunteer and has worked as a policy research analyst at Reform for Illinois.

Notable Honors

2019 , Graduate College of Liberal Arts Student Travel Award, , University of Illinois at Chicago

2018 - 2020, Graduate College of Liberal Arts University Fellowship Recipient, University of Illinois at Chicago

2017, Legal Studies Honors Award Recipient, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Education

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst

- B.A., Legal Studies with Honors, 2017
- B.B.A., Accounting with Honors, 2017

COURSES TAUGHT:

History/Political Science 267: American Intellectual History to 1865 (Fall 2019)

Selected Presentations

“1924: The Origins of Executive Branch Involvement in Immigration Regulation and Enforcement.” Loyola University Chicago History Graduate Student Association Conference. Chicago, IL. November 2019.

 

“Mexico’s Programa Frontera Sur: Border Externalization and Decentralization as Deterrence along the U.S.-Mexico Border.” Stony Brook University History Graduate Student Association Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference. Stony Brook, NY. March 2019.

 

“Mexico’s Programa Frontera Sur: Border Externalization and Decentralization as Deterrence along the U.S.-Mexico Border.” Ball State Student History Conference. Muncie, IN. February 2019.

 

“Mexico’s Programa Frontera Sur: Border Externalization and Decentralization as Deterrence along the U.S.-Mexico Border.” Massachusetts Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference. Amherst, MA. May 2017.

Research Currently in Progress

Kimberly’s current research focuses on the role of the Executive Branch in determining immigration policy and enactment. She argues that in addition to the traditional forms of inherent and formally delegated presidential power over immigration, there has arisen a third form over the course of the 20th century. This new form, de facto delegated power, is driven by legal rules that make a large fraction of resident non-citizens deportable at the option of the President. While Congress retains a monopoly over formal immigration admissions and removal criteria governing the admission and deportation of non-citizens, Kimberly articulates how de facto delegated power has provided the President with vast discretion to shape immigration policy by determining how and over whom to exercise the option to deport.