Photo of Agnani, Sunil

Sunil Agnani, PhD

Associate Professor

History and English

Contact

Building & Room:

2000 UH

Address:

601 S Morgan St.

Office Phone:

(312) 413-2239

CV Download:

Sunil Agnani CV

About

Sunil Agnani holds a joint appointment as an Associate Professor with the Department of English and the Department of History, and teaches courses on the European Enlightenment, eighteenth-century British and French literature and thought, and on the literature of empire and decolonization. His book, Hating Empire Properly: The Two Indies and the Limits of Enlightenment Anticolonialism (New York: Fordham University Press/Kindle version, 2013) was awarded the Harry Levin Prize for Best First Book by the American Comparative Literature Association in 2014, and reads the literature of the Enlightenment in relation to debates in postcolonial thought.

A South Asia edition was co-published in 2016 by Permanent Black Press, New Delhi, in the “Hedgehog & Fox” series.

Recent fellowships include the Rice University Humanities Research Center (2014-2015), and Faculty Fellowship at the Institute for the Humanities at UIC (2016-2017).

He was the Director of Graduate Studies in English for the 2017-2018 year.

Selected Publications

“William Kentridge: Memories of Europe in the Colony.” ArtIndia, Vol. X, issue iii, July/August 2005: 22-25.

“Editor’s Column: The End of Postcolonial Theory? A Roundtable with Sunil Agnani, Fernando Coronil, Gaurav Desai, Mamadou Diouf, Simon Gikandi, Susie Tharu, and Jennifer Wenzel.” Ed. by Patricia Yaeger, Publications of the Modern Language Association / PMLA 122 (2007): 633-51.

Doux Commerce, Douce Colonisation: Diderot and the Two Indies of the French Enlightenment.” Contribution to The Anthropology of the Enlightenment, ed. by Larry Wolff & Marco Cipoloni. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007: 65-84.

“Jacobinism in India, Indianism in English Parliament: Fearing the Enlightenment with Edmund Burke.”  Cultural Critique (Issue 68), Winter 2008: 131-162.

“Entre la France et l’Inde en 1790 : Edmund Burke et les révolutions en Europe et en Asie” (Translation by Ann Sommereux). Contribution to Rêver d’Orient, connaître l’Orient : Visions de l’Orient dans l’art et la littérature britanniques, Isabelle Gadoin and Marie-Élise Palmier-Chatelain (Eds.). Lyons: ENS ÉDITIONS / École normale supérieure, 2008: 285-304.

“India and Haiti as Colonial Spaces of the Enlightenment” in L’Inde des Lumières; Entre l’orientalisme et les sciences socialesPurushartha 31, École des Hautes Études Press, Paris: 2013.

“Colonial Ressentiment, Enlightenment Thought, and the Impasses of Decolonization.” Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, Vol 56 (Autumn 2016).

“The Reception of Edmund Burke’s Imperial Ideas Relating to India, or Burke, the Brahmin and the Hot-House.” London: Bloomsbury Press/Continuum, 2017.

Comment ne pas lire les Lumières : John Morley et la réception victorienne de l’Histoire des deux Indes.” Diderot et la Politique, aujourd’hui, Paris: Société Diderot, 2019.

Review Articles:

“Teaching in Dark Times: A Review of After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York City.” Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 6, Issue 1, Winter 2003: 123-129.

“On the Purported Death of Paris: Pascale Casanova’s The World Republic of Letters.” Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 9, Issue 3, September 2006: 329-335.

“At the Gates of Realism. Srinivas Aravamudan’s Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel.” Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, Vol. 1, Issue 3 (Fall 2014): 1-5.

“For the Love of Lost Sovereignty: Egypt & Postcolonial Thought.” Cultural Critique (Issue 89), Winter 2015: 211-221.

Research Currently in Progress